Museum acquires important Jacob Thompson painting

Date: Friday 20th May 2016
With the latest Jacob Thompson painting acquisition at Penrith museum (left to right) are Jessica Goodfellow, Eden tourism manager; Charlie Thornton, Eden TIC manager; Bridget Davey, secretary of the Friends of Penrith and Eden Museum; Mike Tonkin, Eden District Council chairman; Sydney Chapman, museum curator; Peter Simpson, chairman of the Friends; David Hymers, Eden Council economic portfolio holder; and Corinna Leenem, museum curator.
With the latest Jacob Thompson painting acquisition at Penrith museum (left to right) are Jessica Goodfellow, Eden tourism manager; Charlie Thornton, Eden TIC manager; Bridget Davey, secretary of the Friends of Penrith and Eden Museum; Mike Tonkin, Eden District Council chairman; Sydney Chapman, museum curator; Peter Simpson, chairman of the Friends; David Hymers, Eden Council economic portfolio holder; and Corinna Leenem, museum curator.

PENRITH and Eden Museum has acquired an important painting, The Druids Cutting Down the Mistletoe, by former town artist Jacob Thompson (1806-1879), which is now on display in its Robinson’s School premises in Middlegate.

The work was first exhibited at the Royal Academy in London in 1832 and shows figures in a wooded clearing in the Eden Valley with the Bronze Age stone circle of Long Meg and Her Daughters, one of Eden’s iconicmonuments and tourist destinations, clearly visible in the distance.

According to the artist’s biographer, Llewellyn Jewitt, it was commissioned by Colonel Samuel Lacy (remembered locally as creator of Lacy’s Caves, near Little Salkeld), the then owner of the monument and surrounding land. The painting provides an evocative example of how prehistoric sites were admired and represented by British artists in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The purchase of the painting, valued at £30,000 by Christie’s of London, was made possible by grants from the Friends of Penrith and Eden Museum (£1,000,) the Art Fund (£6,000), V & A Purchase Fund (£12,000), and Eden District Council (£11,000). The work complements other works by Thompson already in the care of the museum, some of them acquired in recent years like The Height of Ambition (2006) and The Close of the Vintage (2003).

Jacob Thompson was born in Langton Street, Penrith, the eldest son of Quaker factory owner Merrick Thompson, whose father had built Factory Yard, in Friargate. He first worked as a sign painter before the Earl of Lonsdale, William Lowther, recognised his talent and helped him to train in the Royal Academy Schools of Art in London.

Thompson quickly excelled and became a successful portrait painter with a studio in Hanover Square, but by 1841 his love of the landscape of Cumbria drew him back to the county for good.

Penrith and Eden Museum’s curator, Dr. Sydney Chapman, said: “Thesubject of the painting is one to which Thompson readily responded, the Druids being seen as living in harmony with and close to nature and a reminder of the influence on the artist of the Quaker poet Thomas Wilkinson, of Yanwath.

“Thompson recalled how as a boy he heard the ‘sage old man’ reciting his verses on Mayburgh Henge and Arthur’s Round Table, which he linked with the oral traditions of the Druids. Another link is with Wordsworth, a close friend of Wilkinson and whose poem on Long Meg and Her Daughters waswritten within a year of the painting being first exhibited.”

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