In this week in history 25 YEARS APPLEBY

Date: Tuesday 24th July 2018

A plea for help went out from a group of Appleby shopkeepers who said excavations by North West Water had cut them off from the rest of the town. Traders in the town’s Low Wiend and Chapel Street said they were losing out on business during what should have been one of their busiest times of the year.

A plea for help went out from a group of Appleby shopkeepers who said excavations by North West Water had cut them off from the rest of the town. Traders in the town’s Low Wiend and Chapel Street said they were losing out on business during what should have been one of their busiest times of the year.

ALSTON

A vital lifeline to local communities was launched as Royal Mail’s new postbus service was unveiled at Alston. Royal Mail postbuses offer a unique service in some of the most remote and picturesque parts of the country, delivering and collecting mail while providing a much-needed passenger transport service.

PENRITH

Eden councillors have done a U-turn on the controversial issue of Penrith’s Saturday market. Less than three months after refusing an application for a permanent open air market from current operators Spook Erection Limited, planners voted in favour of a similar plan from Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s, who own the Skirsgill site.

The new head of Hunter Hall School at Frenchfield Farm, Penrith, is Mrs. Louise Dexter. Mrs. Dexter, who lives at Carlisle, succeeds Aidan Warlow, who retired. Mr. Warlow founded the school in 1985 at the house, Hunter Hall, Great Salkeld, for boys and girls aged 7 to 11.

KESWICK

Successes of the past year were highlighted at the annual meeting of Keswick Lions Club. A sum of £5,000 has been distributed to various organisations — £1,300 to national charities and £2,900 to local charities and organisations.

Children demonstrating Victorian playground games in Keswick’s Market Square marked the last day of the oldest first school in Keswick. Crosthwaite School was opened 160 years ago and closed recently to be replaced after the summer holidays by the new St. Kentigern’s First School.

NEWBIGGIN-ON-LUNE

Pupils of Mrs. Helen Staley and Mrs. Celia Frost gave a recital of organ, piano, keyboard and recorder music in Newbiggin-on-Lune Methodist Chapel. Mrs. Staley introduced the children and gave details of each piece they were going to play, which included a wide variety from classical pieces to television theme tunes.

HUNSONBY

Fancy dress competitors and bandsmen escaped a soaking by minutes as a torrential downpour gave way to watery sunshine just in time for the start of the annual gala parade through Hunsonby and Winskill. Stirring music and an impressive parade by Penrith squadron of the Air Training Corps led the line-up of competitors from Winskill playing field to the pool at Hunsonby for the annual swimming gala.

APPLEBY

A duck race in aid of the Appleby swimming pool appeal fund raised more than £700. The fund now stands at nearly £80,000 towards the £100,000 target.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

A Penrith girl and her Norwegian pen friend met when 15-year-old Else Rabbas, who is visiting this country with her parents and brother, spent three days at the home of her friend, 14-year-old Linda Cleasby, Holme Riggs Avenue. Linda and Else started writing to each other two years ago, when Linda — a Tynefield School pupil — asked for a pen friend through the Girl Guide movement and chose to write to Else who lives in Mosjoen, a town similar in size to Penrith.

KIRKBY THORE

A village supermarket is being planned for Kirkby Thore by a North Westmorland businessman, Mr. George Smailes, Highways, Cliburn. Mr. Smailes has made a preliminary inquiry about the proposal to North Wesmorland Rural Council, say minutes which came up for approval.

NORTH STAINMORE

The Minister of Housing and Local Government has reversed a decision of Westmorland County Council by allowing a North Stainmore man to alter and repair a fellside farmhouse, thought to be over 200 years old. Dr. John Newsome, Cumpstone House, conducted his own case at a planning inquiry when he appealed against the County Council’s refusal of permission to make the farmhouse, Longcrag, North Stainmore, into a dwelling for his retirement.

CALDBECK

The months ahead promise to be hectic for 23-year-old Miss Olive James, Greenhead Farm, Caldbeck, who after returning home from a memorable round-the-world-trip to New Zealand, has found herself inundated by requests for her to visit Young Farmers’ Clubs, Women’s Institutes, etc.

SHAP

A message in a bottle came to light while workmen were demolishing an old shop at the Shap Granite Works. The bottle, discovered just above the front doorway, contained a shilling, a six-pence, a threepence, a penny and a halfpenny, together with copies of the “Herald” and the long-defunct “Cumberland and Westmorland Advertiser” dated June, 1871. There is also a letter signed by M. J. Robinson, aged 16, which says: “The foundation stone of this shop, built for the benefit of the workmen on the Shap Granite Works, was laid on Saturday, June 17, 1871.”

100 YEARS

KESWICK

A war-time Convention is being held in the town and speakers include the Bishops of Durham and Carlisle. The meetings are to be held each evening in the Market Square.

A declaration was made from the Town Hall steps that Keswick and the district has raised £25,755 in War Bonds and War Saving Certificates during the War Weapons Week. The joint organising secretaries were Messrs J. Broatch and H. Swinburn.

EDENHALL

Winners of a drawing held by children of Edenhall School to aid the National Lifeboat Institution and the Prisoners of War Fund, were: 1 Miss J. Campbell, Langwathby; 2 Miss K. E. Smith, Lazonby. During the past six months the children have raised £17 15s 9d for war funds.