In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 3rd September 2018

The new face of secondary education in Penrith emerged as both schools began admitting pupils across the full 11-18 year age group. Both Queen Elizabeth Grammar School and the renamed Ullswater Community College reported a smooth move into the new school year and the new system of 11-18 education.

The new face of secondary education in Penrith emerged as both schools began admitting pupils across the full 11-18 year age group. Both Queen Elizabeth Grammar School and the renamed Ullswater Community College reported a smooth move into the new school year and the new system of 11-18 education.

Penrith authoress and leading female mountaineer Gwen Moffat has hit the heights yet again, with her latest novel. “The Outside Edge”, published by Macmillan, appeared on the bookshelves. Gwen, the first woman guide to be appointed by the British Mountaineering Council, has written many books.

PORTINSCALE

A county heart transplant patient has appealed for more people to carry donor cards after returning home from a lifesaving operation. George Cheshire was allowed home just six weeks after his operation at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle. He said his heart had been far worse than had been suspected and, without the transplant, he would not have been around at the end of the year.

ALSTON

As more and more heavy lorries grind their way across the North Pennines, residents in Alston and surrounding villages are facing a double threat from the danger and dirt caused by the pressure on their roads. One elderly couple living at Slaggyford, north of Alston in the South Tyne Valley, say they have been almost imprisoned in their own home by the number of lorries thundering past their door.

SOULBY

One of the highlights of the flower festival and exhibition in Soulby was an lifelike model of part of the village, made by retired farmer Arthur Bainbridge. He began the project eighteen months ago after initially making models of two houses and the bridge in Soulby. However, he found himself adding to it as villagers asked him to make the church, the chapel and models of their houses.

KESWICK

Among the prize-winners at Keswick show there was none so delighted and shocked as the owner of both the champion Fell and mountain and moorland ponies. Glenis Cockbain, Rakefoot Farm, Keswick, took the double award with her two six-year-old ponies.

50 YEARS

APPLEBY

Golfers are used to hazards — but not of the type encountered by two ladies playing on the Appleby course. Miss Margaret Stamper, Culgaith, and Mrs. Margaret Downing, Brough Sowerby, were walking down the ninth fairway when they heard a noise behind them — and saw a massive bull advancing. “It was a bull and a half,” said Mrs. Downing. “And it seemed a bit frisky.” Play was hastily abandoned as the two ladies, along with other golfers in the vicinity, fled in the direction of a wall. In her dash to escape the bull’s attentions, a lady golfer from Barnard Castle lost one of her shoes in a patch of soft earth. The bull, thought to have escaped from a field nearby, made a leisurely patrol of the course before deciding to explore a nearby farm. Meanwhile, Miss Stamper had summoned the police and Sergt. D. Read helped to “arrest” the wandering animal.

LAKE DISTRICT

A new method of tackling the problem of the overcrowding of the Lake District by visitors is suggested in the current issue of the “Architects’ Journal”. Instead of trying to avoid congestion by traffic management schemes, the writer suggests a survey to determine the “environment capacity” of the popular areas and then control of the number of vehicles coming into the area so that the capacity is not exceeded. “Environment capacity” is decided by estimating how many people can be dispersed on the fells, paths and by the lakeside without destroying the degree of solitude which is part of the attraction of the area.

CROSBY RAVENSWORTH

Promoters of the village show with the remarkable weather record are hoping that it will last at least one more year. Ever since the post-war revival of the annual show at Crosby Ravensworth it has fallen on a fine day. Villagers realise that this is the kind of thing which cannot go on for ever —but they have a special reason for wanting a sunny day next year to mark the 100th show. It all started way back in 1856, but war-time lapses have reduced the number of exhibitions.

APPLEBY

Residents of Appleby were taken aback to see a group of young men in shirt sleeves, from various professions, hammering away at the metal fence which surrounds the cricket pitch. They need not have worried, however, for this was the first stage in repair work to the fence which is being undertaken by the Appleby and District Round Table as their contribution towards Appleby flood relief.

100 YEARS

GRASMERE

Grasmere’s “grand old man”, Mr. William Baldry, who was one of the founders of Grasmere sports, has died aged 90. A native of Norfolk, he came to Grasmere in 1855 as a master of the school there. When the Urban Council was formed he came a member and also held many public offices. Mr. Baldry introduced cricket to town in 1856, and was specially honoured by King Edward when he visited Lakeland the following year. Mr. Baldry and his wife celebrated their diamond wedding in 1914, but she died two years ago.