In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Wednesday 12th September 2018

Penrith-based company Lilliput Lane sparked a property boom, with hundreds of cottages changing hands for record sums at a major auction. The properties concerned were, of course, miniatures and, at the auction in Leeds, rare pieces from the model company’s early ranges were sold for hundreds of times their original retail value to a packed gathering of avid collectors.

Penrith-based company Lilliput Lane sparked a property boom, with hundreds of cottages changing hands for record sums at a major auction. The properties concerned were, of course, miniatures and, at the auction in Leeds, rare pieces from the model company’s early ranges were sold for hundreds of times their original retail value to a packed gathering of avid collectors.

CUMBRIA

A financial bombshell could leave Cumbria’s schools facing savage spending cuts next year — with parents being asked to raise sums totalling more than £1 million to pay for teaching equipment. A county report has revealed that parents are already forking out over £3-4m to top up school funds across Cumbria but the problem could get worse.

Royal Mail delivered good news to customers who were angry about the loss of local postmarks. The Post Office has bowed to consumer pressure and agreed to allow letters to be stamped with local postmarks if so desired. There was an outcry when Royal Mail announced its intention to stamp all Cumbria area letters with the postmark “Cumbria, Dumfries and Galloway”.

KESWICK

A team from the Metropolitan Police is in Cumbria investigating the strength of local bowling teams. The 34 officers are all members of a police sports club bowling team and are visiting Cumbria to take part in a series of friendly matches against local bowls teams.

ALSTON

Alston Agricultural Society’s 155th anniversary was celebrated by the annual show. The day turned out to be cool but dry, making conditions ideal for both animals and a good crowd of spectators which was reflected in the gate takings of £650. Exhibitors came from a wide area to the 25th show confined to sheep, with classes for collie dogs, terriers, gundogs and children’s pets. The goat section was dispensed with this year after quite a drop in entries last year.

The death occurred at the great age of 108 of Miss Hannah Maughan, late of Greycroft, Alston. She died in Alston Cottage Hospital where she spent the last five years of her life. With a remarkable lifetime in nursing, her origins stemmed from a farming family whose ancestors go back some 200 years in the parish of Kirkhaugh, and she had a particular devotion to the church of the Holy Paraclete where the name of Maughan figures prominently.

MORLAND

After nine years as Morland’s vicar, Canon Michael Cross will be stepping down when he retires. Mr. Cross has been vicar of Morland with Thrimby and Great Strickland since September 1984, becoming rural dean for Appleby in December 1991.

KABER

The fifth annual Kaber show was bigger and better than ever with entries up and new classes to encourage already keen exhibitors. The weather held find for the crowds, who had turned out to see the county’s newest agricultural show held on the green in the centre of the village which recently won the Cumbria in Bloom best kept hamlet award.

THRELKELD

The National Rivers Authority has been making molehills out of mountains in a bid to help disabled people enjoy one of the most picturesque areas of the Lake District. The authority has used over 5,000 tonnes of gravel recovered from the River Derwent to reduce the gradients of paths in the Threlkeld area, so that they can be used by people in wheelchairs.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

Penrith firemen had to be called in when an 80-year-old man became trapped by both hands in a window. When the sash cord of his bedroom window broke and the heavy frame dropped on to his hands, Mr. George Goodwin, Barco Lodge, Folly Lane, Penrith, was unable to summon help. Eventually he was found by 18-year-old Miss Susan Goodwin, daughter of Mr. Goodwin’s nephew, and she called in the brigade after being unable to free Mr. Goodwin from his predicament. The firemen soon had Mr. Goodwin free as they prised up the window frame and he was afterwards treated by a doctor, mainly for shock.

A top price of £520 was paid for a marquetry china cabinet at the auction salesrooms, Castlegate, when Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s conducted a sale of the furnishings from West Garth, Morland, on instructions from the Executors of the late Miss E. Sharp-Naters.

The “Penrith Observer” ceased separate publication and its copyright and goodwill has been transferred by its proprietors, Cumberland Newspapers Ltd., to the Herald Company. “The Herald,” for national advertising purposes, now becomes associated with the group of weekly papers published elsewhere in Cumberland by Cumberland Newspapers Ltd. This group, with the inclusion of the “Herald’s” net sale of over 18,000 copies, now offers national advertisers a total net sale of 94,368 copies weekly through its London office.

APPLEBY

Miss Marion Schauman, Appleby, has been chosen to enter the Border Television final of the “Miss I.T.V.” competition. Miss Schauman was among nine competitors who took part in the first heat of the Border competition, and she was selected to go into the final, together with Barbara Scales, Cockermouth.

100 YEARS

BROUGHAM

Another camp for ten German prisoners has been established near Lightwater Smithy in Brougham parish. The camp is pitched on a Moorhouse holding in a field below the Countess Pillar.

TEBAY

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mason, Willington, have celebrated their golden wedding. Although they have lived at Willington for 35 years, they were married at Tebay Primitive Methodist Chapel in 1868.