In this year in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Wednesday 27th December 2017

A new image, celebrating the history and people of Penrith, goes on display at the town’s library. Alan Stones’s vision of “Eden” is set to become one of the lasting images of the town and depicting changing times in Penrith, and will itself become part of the town’s history. Alan, who has lived at Blencarn for the last ten years, was commissioned to do the work by Eden District Council, the county library service, Triumph Properties Limited and Northern Arts.

A new image, celebrating the history and people of Penrith, goes on display at the town’s library. Alan Stones’s vision of “Eden” is set to become one of the lasting images of the town and depicting changing times in Penrith, and will itself become part of the town’s history. Alan, who has lived at Blencarn for the last ten years, was commissioned to do the work by Eden District Council, the county library service, Triumph Properties Limited and Northern Arts.

Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School is set to begin admitting 11-year-old pupils in September — despite lack of a Government response to the application to become an 11-18 school. However, the success or otherwise of the move will rely on parents putting forward their children’s names for entry.

EDEN

Individual town postmarks for Penrith, Appleby, Alston and Kirkby Stephen are to disappear. They are to be replaced with the postmark “Cumbria, Dumfries and Galloway” in a Royal Mail move which is aimed at increasing efficiency and keeping down costs.

THRELKELD

Hills of Corby Hill Ltd. have bought the former town centre site of Keswick food wholesalers Four Seasons Food who have moved to a new £1 million premises at Threlkeld. Planning permission has been granted for a shopping and housing development on the Keswick site which also includes a petrol station.

KESWICK

Maverick councillor Paul Buttle boycotted the mayor of Keswick’s annual Christmas party at the Conservative Club. Mr. Buttle is the former poll tax rebel who has a reputation on the council of opposing any expenditure he considers excessive. However, he said that his non-attendance at the party was because he considered that a political club was the wrong place in which to hold a civic function.

GREYSTOKE

Adventurer Myles Morley was forced to abandon his attempt to conquer Everest in winter 8,000ft. from the top of the world’s highest mountain after suffering high altitude problems with his eyes. Myles, who works in outdoor management training, arrived back at his Greystoke home. “I was gutted to have to come down off the mountain,” he said.

APPLEBY

Despite being asked to move from his traditional spot in the town’s cloisters because of his “pagan” origins, Santa Claus received a warm welcome in Appleby from 170 delighted children when he set up a grotto in a stableyard at the rear of the Tufton Hotel. Hotel proprietor Mr. Nigel Milsom said that Santa had first moved to the stableyard after the church asked him to vacate the cloisters. The vicar of Appleby, the Rev. Peter Norton, said he believed that Santa Claus should not be confused with the true message of Christmas about the birth of Christ.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

A collection box for National Children’s Homes was placed in the vestibule of the Penrith Congregational Church and about £1 was collected. After the service the box was left unattended for a few minutes, with the outer door closed but not locked. When the stewards returned the money had gone.

A bid to retain Penrith’s oldest primary — the 300-year-old Robinson’s Church of England School, in Middlegate — is being made by a housewife and mother with many happy memories of the school. Organising a petition against the proposed closure is 39-year-old Mrs. Ivy Nowak, Tyne Close Terrace, who, as Ivy Brackwell, attended the school with other members of her family.

A Penrith girl, Mrs. Celia Somerville (nee Moses), flew to Singapore to join her husband who is serving in the Royal Navy on board “H.M.S. Triumph”. She expects to be away from Britain for two years.

A senior member of the Penrith Sandgate Head Methodist Chapel for many years, Mrs. Mary Hannah Westmorland, celebrated her 98th birthday in Stainton View House. Though she is a native of Ravenstonedale, Mrs. Westmorland’s life has centred mainly on the chapel, which closed in January.

ALSTON

Reading a copy of the “Herald” in her home in Porterville, California, is Mrs. Felix Scott Alston. She featured in a front page story of the visit of herself and her husband to Alston, Cumberland. A photograph of her and the paper was published in a recent issue of the Porterville Evening Recorder and it told the story of the visit. Mr. and Mrs. Alston were on holiday in Britain in October when they saw the name Alston on the map and decided they must visit it.

HESKET-NEW-MARKET

Retirement after fifty years on the same farm may not sound the formula for an exciting life, yet it would be a wrong impression to form in the case of 84-year-old, Mr. John William Wharton, Durdar Road, Carlisle. Mr. Wharton has spent the past half-century at Hesket Hall, Hesket-new-Market. He looked back on a life in which, among other things, he has emigrated twice, visited some of the world’s most glamorous spots and made two hazardous crossings of the Atlantic.

100 YEARS

ALSTON

The death has occurred of Alston’s “Grand Old Man”, the oldest inhabitant, Mr. Matthew Graham, aged 93. Born at Alston, he spent his early years working days mining at Nenthead. Then, at the age of 37, he became a postman, completing the daily round of 16 miles until retirement. Mr. Graham married Miss Armstrong, Nentsbury, 63 years ago.

TEBAY

Recently the Tebay locomotive shed has lost three oldest drivers from the footplate — Edmund Porter, after 56 years; Charles Ferguson, 55 years; and Alexandra Remington, 54 years. The experiences of all three of the early days of railway work are most interesting. They are able to recall how when climbing a steep gradient, there was always another train waiting to give a friendly push.