In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 EDENHALL

Date: Tuesday 28th May 2019

Opening batsman Tim McVey smashed his way into the cricket record books. Edenhall player Tim, a teacher at a Preston school, achieved the rare feat of hitting six 6s in one over on his way to a century in a Cumbria League game against Cleator II. His innings of 178 was a league record, as was his team’s total of 332 for five in 45 overs.

Opening batsman Tim McVey smashed his way into the cricket record books. Edenhall player Tim, a teacher at a Preston school, achieved the rare feat of hitting six 6s in one over on his way to a century in a Cumbria League game against Cleator II. His innings of 178 was a league record, as was his team’s total of 332 for five in 45 overs.

ALSTON

The century-old family building firm of H. Kearton and Sons Limited, Alston, collapsed with the loss of thirty jobs. The construction company went into voluntary liquidation, although Kearton’s will continue as funeral directors. While regretting the loss of the family firm, county councillor Bryan Metz said that all was not depression on the jobs front on Alston Moor. Another Alston-based company, Precision Products, are about to start work on a factory extension after winning two big European orders.

PENRITH

More than two years of fund-raising has allowed Penrith Town Band to purchase a second hand E flat bass in their centenary year. The bass, one of the largest instruments in the band, replaces one of the two Sons of Temperance instruments which are now more than sixty years old and beginning to show wear. Band representative Ian Butterworth said the majority of the money had been raised by playing at functions and through the generosity of the public.

Pupils at Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School went to the polls to vote for candidates in their own mock European election. More than 450 pupils took part out of a total of 646. Alex Lattin, standing for the Rocky Horror Party, was the convincing winner, polling 32.8 per cent. of the votes. Labour Party candidate David Spruce came second with 21.2 per cent.

Mrs. Mary Beck, better known in her professional capacity as Mary Reed, who has died aged 79, was the first Penrith woman to qualify as a solicitor. She was also the first woman to become president of Carlisle and District Law Society and was elected an honorary member on her retirement.

ARMATHWAITE

An Eden farming family have won a top award, thanks to attention to detail which boosted dairy margins at their 160-acre Armathwaite farm. The family partnership of Robert Craig and his parents, James and Frances, have been awarded the 1994 Genus Milkminder Manager of the Year award despite their Cairnhead Farm being designated a less favoured area and “severely disadvantaged”.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

PENRITH

A plea for the preservation of the attractiveness of Penrith was made at a meeting of the Urban Council by Mr. Geoffrey Johnston. He referred to a speech by the English Lakes’ Counties Travel Association president, Lord Inglewood, who had asked authorities to look carefully at their town centre development plans so as not to destroy historical and characteristic features which make tourist attractions. “We have quite a number of these and I hope the Council will try to preserve what we have left,” said Mr. Johnston.

An outline planning application for a county primary school and playing fields at Anchor Farm, Penrith, is to be referred to the Cumberland Control and Planning Sub-Committee with a recommendation for approval, it was agreed at a meeting of Penrith Urban Council. An Urban Council spokesman told the “Herald” there were no plans in being for the school and the application was just a matter of reserving the site for the future.

LOWTHER

A 130-acre area of Lowther Park took on a new role as a wildlife park, described by one of the promoters of the venture as “the ultimate in zoos, with no bars and people walking among the animals”. But the Earl of Lonsdale, who has launched the venture in co-operation with Pentland Hick, Chairman of Associated Pleasure Parks Ltd., gave this light hearted assurance: “Only over my dead body will we have lions!”

APPLEBY

The noted two days’ sale of breeding and feeding sheep at Appleby opened when Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s had an entry of 6,861 Masham, greyfaced, Suffolk cross, half-bred and Cheviot shearlings and hoggs with followers. Hoggs with single lambs sold to £9 15s from Newbiggin (Graham).

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

PENRITH

A meeting was held at the Central Temperance Hotel to discuss the revival of the swimming club. Private Tom Wilson, a former champion, had called the meeting and presided over a good attendance. The club has been dormant since 1914, and during a flood the pavilion was washed away. However, the acting secretary, Mr. Robert Howe, has got in touch with Canadians, with a view to purchasing one of the huts on the Beacon. It was decided to call a further meeting. Messrs. W. H. B. Leech, J. S. Yeates, R. Hunter, W. Johnston and C. Cooper spoke in favour of a revival.

SHAP

The headmaster at Roughill School, Shap, has resigned and, as the average number on the register is only five, the managers are to be requested to consider permanently closing the school.

APPLEBY

Lieut.-Colonel Percy M. Hope, son of Mr. J. F. Hope, Appleby, and late surveyor to the West Ward Rural Council, is home on two months’ leave from Mesopotamia. He was a lieutenant in the Border Regiment, with which he went to India at the outbreak of war.