In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 KIRKBY STEPHEN

Date: Tuesday 7th May 2019

Plans for the £6 million bypass for Kirkby Stephen were approved without comment by members of Cumbria County Council’s planning sub-committee, despite strong letters from some objectors. Sub-committee chairman Ron Calvin said approval would be subject to consideration being given to crossing of the A685 by users of the coast-to-coast walk and the maintenance of stone walls. Local member Raven Frankland said: “How happy I am to hear you use the word ‘agree’. It is the choice between two evils. The evil has come because of the disappearance of the railway.”

Plans for the £6 million bypass for Kirkby Stephen were approved without comment by members of Cumbria County Council’s planning sub-committee, despite strong letters from some objectors. Sub-committee chairman Ron Calvin said approval would be subject to consideration being given to crossing of the A685 by users of the coast-to-coast walk and the maintenance of stone walls. Local member Raven Frankland said: “How happy I am to hear you use the word ‘agree’. It is the choice between two evils. The evil has come because of the disappearance of the railway.”

ASKHAM

An attractive Askham building has changed its role, from the teaching of eight-year-olds to housing villagers up to eighty. The old village school, which closed in 1988, has now been converted to three homes for older people with local connections. Occupants are now happily settled into their new homes, the oldest being 80-year-old Mrs. Sarah Holme, a member of a farming family who has spent all her life in Askham.

PENRITH

Community support is being sought for the launch of a fund-raising drive to provide a learner pool at Penrith’s two-year-old swimming pool. Following joint ventures between Eden Council and community supporters to provide a new indoor pool at Appleby and a climbing wall at Penrith, building of a learner pool could be on the cards in the coming year. Members of Penrith Swimming Club have already approached the council and offered £20,000 from the sale of the old Frenchfield pool to kick off the fund.

Royal Lifesaving Society honours for 1994 have gone to Penrith businesswoman Mrs. Jenny Birtle, who is probably the area’s best known teacher and promoter of swimming and lifesaving skills. Mrs. Birtle, a founder member of the Cumbria branch of the society, has been made an honorary life member of the society in recognition of her years of service. In 1972 Mrs. Birtle was honoured with a special Commonwealth award from the society’s grand president, the late Earl Mountbatten, and she has also been invited to special functions at Buckingham Palace, Australia House and the Mansion House.

The biggest potters’ market ever to be held in the UK will be staged at Penrith in June. More than a hundred potters will gather at Potfest 94 on the weekend of 4th and 5th June in the first step in creating a major annual ceramics festival in the North.

KESWICK

Residents of a new block of flats in Keswick are facing a 25 per cent. increase in rent after just five months. Residents of Elm Court are upset over a clause in the lease which allows the landlords to put up charges without any consideration of current market rents. Notices have just been issued saying that the monthly rent will go up from £350 to £415.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

EDENHALL

Applications for planning permission to come before the Planning Committee of Penrith Rural Council include one by Edenhall Cricket Club for the erection of a new pavilion. The club is this year celebrating its centenary.

CUMBERLAND

Many Cumberland farmers who were among the 27,000 who refused to pay the Agricultural Training Board levy have received summonses to appear before a County Court at Bromley in Kent. The headquarters of the Board are at Bromley and all the cases are down to be heard there. The National Farmers’ Union has repudiated the Board and asked for it to be wound up and many local farmers have refused to pay the levy of £3 10s per worker because they believe adequate training facilities are provided in this area through Newton Rigg Farm College.

LOWTHER

The Earl of Lonsdale is to open his deer park at Lowther to the public as a wildlife picnic area. The 130 acre park, four miles south of Penrith, will be opened on 20th May and will be open daily from 10 a. m. to about two hours before dusk.

PENRITH

The Royal Air Force Association’s top honour, the National Efficiency Trophy, has been won for the second year in succession and the third time in all by the Penrith Branch. The Penrith Branch secretary, Mr. Raymond Bulman, said: “It is a phenomenal thing to have won this award again, never mind for the second year in succession. It is a great credit to the Penrith Branch which is small compared to many others in the country.” The Penrith Branch has more than 200 members and the Penrith R.A.F.A. Club, which is also taken into consideration, has 450 members.

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

PENRITH

At the annual vestry meeting of St. Andrew’s Church, Penrith, the Vicar, Canon Byard, referred to the 165 Penrithians who had given their lives in the war and suggested the erection of a cross in the churchyard and the placing of a brass tablet in the church, bearing their names, as a fitting memorial.

KESWICK

The wartime hospital at Lingholm, the home of Lord and Lady Rochdale, has been closed because the larger military hospitals now have beds to spare. The officers at the hospital made a presentation to Lady Rochdale, who is the Commandant, of a solid silver rosebowl on an ebony stand. The nurses presented Dr. Burnett with a leather album and Nurse Vessey, the Matron, received a silver teapot.