In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 4th June 2019

Nostalgia for an old Westmorland County Council steam roller started Don Cuttriss and Tom Cragg on their 30-year quest for old and rare machinery to restore. But the unsupportive attitude of current local authorities eventually convinced them to break up their unique collection at Penrith’s steam museum. The result was a sale at Penrith auction mart which attracted steam enthusiast buyers from all over Britain as well as several countries around the world. The top price of £34,000 was paid for a maroon, black and gold 1934 Marshall steam traction engine.

Nostalgia for an old Westmorland County Council steam roller started Don Cuttriss and Tom Cragg on their 30-year quest for old and rare machinery to restore. But the unsupportive attitude of current local authorities eventually convinced them to break up their unique collection at Penrith’s steam museum. The result was a sale at Penrith auction mart which attracted steam enthusiast buyers from all over Britain as well as several countries around the world. The top price of £34,000 was paid for a maroon, black and gold 1934 Marshall steam traction engine.

The newly appointed deputy head of Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School is staff member Dr. Peter Huggett. He joined the school as head of mathematics in 1984 and, on the untimely death of head Donald Fay last year, was appointed acting deputy head.

APPLEBY

“Hit and run” parking is causing a headache for Appleby residents who say the police aren’t doing enough to enforce the rules. The complain was raised at a meeting of the local police division’s community liaison committee. Inspector Peter Brown said one problem was that a number of double yellow lines around Appleby could not be enforced because the lines themselves were not legal. The lines were not wide enough to meet regulations and the police had no power to enforce the rules unless the county council’s highways department sorted out the problem.

ORTON

Villagers at Orton are up in arms over a diversion to the coast to coast walk which now takes users directly between Kirkby Stephen and Shap. Although the changes are legal, objectors say it is irresponsible to take walkers across 23 miles of heather moorland on their fifth day of the trek and leave them without means of calling for assistance or buying refreshments. Previously, when Orton was on the mapped walk, the village could offer users a shop, post office, tea room, public house and bed and breakfast facilities.

ALSTON

The threat to the future of Alston’s visitor attraction railway station has been lifted — at least for the time being. South Tynedale Railway Preservation Society volunteers, who run the railway, had warned that the attraction might be forced to close because of a Cumbria County Council decision to split and sell off the station, track and adjoining land and buildings on the open market. The matter was referred back to the county property sub-committee for further consideration and there was all party support for the setting up of special talks.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

PENRITH

The prospect of an organisation devoted to the improvement and beautification of Penrith is likely to be realised when a meeting is to be held in the Ullswater Centre to launch a Civic Society. The steering committee, who met to make final arrangements, are hoping that the gathering will be one of the biggest public meetings in Penrith for many years. First plans were made earlier this year at Greystoke Castle after a letter to the “Herald” from Mrs. Gracia Howard, American-born wife of Mr. Stafford Howard. Its publication co-incided with a report of a speech, favouring the formation of a society, by Mr. P. B. Armstrong, President of the Chamber of Trade, and he and Mrs. Howard have done a major part of the “pioneer work”.

With the stage set for a 21st birthday party to remember, luck deserted the organisers of Penrith Gala at Pooley Bridge, when, instead of hoped-for sunshine, there were rain clouds and a chilling wind, and not even the re-introduction of cycle racing in a new form could attract a crowd of any size. In an afternoon which provided some fine individual efforts, the best was by Scots runner Sandy Nelson, from Kinross, who became the first holder of the new “Billy Watson” memorial trophy. It was presented in memory of the late Mr. W. H. Watson, Penrith — former local racing cyclist, a stalwart of the Gala and one of those instrumental in its revival — by his daughter, Mrs. Doreen Arnison.

CUMBERLAND

The change to decimal coinage could mean an increase in the price of milk and Cumberland farmers are anxious that the public should know that the extra money will not go to them. Members of the Cumberland and North Westmorland Executive of the National Farmers’ Union urged that the position be clarified. A Union spokesman pointed out that the cost of a bottle of milk, which will rise by a 1/2d due to the seasonal increase in July, could rise by a further 1/2d in August when prices may be adjusted into line with decimalisation.

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

PENRITH

A young Penrith man, 19-year-old Isaac Chapelhow, son of Mr. J. Chapelhow, William Street, Penrith, who fell from near the top of Brougham Castle, is now completely restored to health, after sustaining a severe fracture of the skull and serious injuries to the legs and ankles. Mr. Chapelhow, who had just been demobilised from the R. A. F., was climbing to the top of the Castle when a stone became dislodged and he fell into the courtyard, fortunately landing on his feet.

ALSTON

Top price at the Crewe Shorthorn Sales held recently was 900 gns. for a six-year-old dark roan cow, purchased by Mr. John Gill, Stainton. The animal was one of Lady Egerton’s herd from Tatton, and came from the famous Lavender family.