In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 PLUMPTON

Date: Monday 10th June 2019

A trial scheme to put more police on the beat in Eden’s villages and rural communities was launched at Plumpton. Four special constables joined their colleagues from the regular force to take up patrol duty around the countryside to the north of Penrith, covering an area stretching from Culgaith to Skelton. The aim of the new scheme is to raise the profile of rural policing and put more officers on the beat in small villages.

A trial scheme to put more police on the beat in Eden’s villages and rural communities was launched at Plumpton. Four special constables joined their colleagues from the regular force to take up patrol duty around the countryside to the north of Penrith, covering an area stretching from Culgaith to Skelton. The aim of the new scheme is to raise the profile of rural policing and put more officers on the beat in small villages.

HESKET-NEW-MARKET

Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd was in Cumbria to present prizes at a sheep event held at Wood Hall, Hesket-new-Market. Mr. Hurd stayed for about an hour at North Sheep ‘94, a specialist event organised by the northern region of the National Sheep Association. He awarded cups for the best stands before giving television and radio interviews about the forthcoming European elections and posing to have his photograph taken.

KESWICK

With just two weeks to go before the curtain goes up on the summer season, staff at the Century Theatre in Keswick are confident that alterations to the building will be completed in time. Two Portacabins have been lifted into place to create a new foyer and bar area. The “Blue Box” theatre was threatened with closure on several occasions because it failed to comply with modern fire regulations. However, with £50,000 of alterations and improvements the building is expected to be in use until a proposed replacement is built on the Lakeland site.

PENRITH

Penrith’s man of music for almost half-a-century, dance band leader Frank Walton, died, aged 72. Millions of people have danced to bands led by Mr. Walton in the post-war era. His Melody Makers — Jack Varty, Tommy Arragon, Charlie Wannop, Gordon Wilson, Geoff Parr, Cliff Stout, Dick Redhead and many others — played for the “bob hops” which were a feature of Penrith’s Saturday night life until the Drill Hall had to be demolished in the early 1960s. He was proprietor of the Music House, in Middlegate, Penrith, for 36 years.

The former managing director of a Penrith chemists’ business, James Carrie, has died at the age of 73. Born at Arbroath, Mr. Carrie studied at Dundee School of Pharmacy and came to Penrith after joining J. Cowper Limited in 1950. He served with the firm for 34 years. Golf was his great leisure time interest and he served as both captain and vice-president of the Penrith club.

APPLEBY

Three jazz enthusiast brothers, brought up at Kirkby Stephen and now scattered around the world, have made the Appleby jazz festival their annual reunion. Peter, Eric and David Thompson, who are all former pupils of Appleby Grammar School, will meet for the third year running at this year’s festival. The brothers lived in Kirkby Stephen, where their late step-father, James Longstaff, was a butcher. Their mother, Mrs. Peggy Longstaff, lived at Hartley until a few years ago.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

NORTH WESTMORLAND

Two eleven-year-old North Westmorland children were having the thrill of their lives on a Ravenstonedale sheep farm, as the “stars” in a T.V. colour production, part of a new B.B.C. junior series entitled “Summer Search”. They are Victoria Moss, of Kelso House, Fletcher Hill, Kirkby Stephen, and Paul Brook, of The Bield, Ravenstonedale, who were chosen to feature in the second of a series of six programs being directed by David Turnbull. He descended with his camera crew on Artlegarth, a sheep farm whose house and buildings nestle in a fold of the hills just outside Ravenstonedale.

APPLEBY

One of Appleby’s best-known figures, Mr. Herbert Forster, Eden Place Hotel, retired after about thirty years’ service with Ribble Motor Services Ltd., latterly as a senior inspector. Mr. Forster began as a driver in Carlisle, moving to Appleby as a driver ten years ago. He now plans to enlarge his private hotel business.

PENRITH

Penrith traders received their assessments of extra charges proposed by the Urban Council for removal of their refuse and many have been shocked by the size of the bill — the figures are as high as £260 a year in the case of the town’s biggest traders — and reactions have ranged from “ridiculous” to “unnecessary” to the unprintable! The aggrieved tradesmen — who maintain that they pay their rates already for their refuse removal and the proposed charges are too high in any case — are being advised to hold their “fire” until the matter has been discussed by the Chamber of Trade, which is championing their cause.

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

PENRITH

The Duke Street Assembly Room was crowded for a meeting held to revive a branch of the Shop Assistants’, Clerks’ and Warehousemen’s Union. Mr. G. Armstrong presided and Mr. G. Sisson spoke. Over 60 men signified their intention of joining the branch.

APPLEBY

At a time when a strike of farm workers is threatened, branches of the National Farmers’ Union have been formed at Appleby and Kirkby Stephen where speeches were given at special meetings by Mr. W. Dobson, President of the Cumberland and Westmorland branch. At Appleby the first chairman is Mr. W. Graham, and others on the committee are Messrs T. Dalton, M. Thompson, W. Cleasby, I. Dodd, A. Brunskill, J. N. Ewbank, W. L. Richardson, J. J. Bell, J. Crosby and E. Thompson.